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Judgemental-Dbag-Mommy-Chat.com Launches New Site For Loudmouth Mommies to Swap Insults and Judge One Another While Droning on Endlessly About Their Stupid and Unoriginal Opinions About Everything.

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By   /   July 31, 2015  /   No Comments

Judgemental-Dbag-Mommy-Chat.com, who wisely predicted that women permanently banned from such websites as youbemom.com or urbanbaby.com for bad behavior would kill for the opportunity to get back in the game, has finally gone live.

“We’re fully aware that some view us as urbanbaby and youbemom.com’s sloppy seconds,” said JDMC.com founder Karla Dworin. “But believe me, if you saw some of the originality, effort, and literary acrobatics that go into these women’s unprompted insults and character eviscerations, you’d realize these Judgemental-Dbag-Mommy-Chat.com bitches are anything but sloppy.

Caitlin Ahern, who was ejected from urbanbaby.com in January after referring to a woman inquiring into special-ed programs for her daughter as “an undersexed, overprivileged, new money low class Scarsdale c*nt who probably waxes her own back,” was over the moon when she heard about Judgemental-Dbag-Mommy-Chat.com.

“I always thought that the moderators on those other sites had a real trigger finger,” said Ahern. “But with Judgemental-Dbag-Mommy-Chat.com, it’s like there is no moderator. I’ve said things that I’m immediately deeply ashamed of and it’s like ‘hello? Anybody gonna call me on this stuff?’ Guess not.”

Mommy boards, as they’re often referred, began popping up in the early 2000s as a way for mothers (and the occasional unemployed dad), to swap information, ask for advice, and be there as a sort of virtual, anonymous shoulder on which to lean. Almost immediately, it became clear that it’s users were actually more intent on using it as a place to practice the art of bile-slinging and the repercussion-free, anonymous insulting of complete, innocent strangers.

“I lasted about one year on Urbanbaby [.com] before I had to just leave out of pure disgust,” said Lisa Hamper of Pelham NY. “I think the sites’ initial intentions were good, but if you consider that half of the women on there are uncomfortably pregnant and miserable, and the other half are new, exhausted moms, well, it just makes for a really explosive, bitchy environment.”

Another issue some have with these forums is that they’re becoming less and less about parenting – something that Judgemental-Dbag-Mommy-Chat.com claims as a differentiating factor.

“I’ve seen discussions on some of those other boards about, for example, inoculation, turn into a combative ‘discussion’ about what a loser the original poster is because she happened to mention that she drives a 2008 Subaru Forrester,” said JDMC.com’s Dworin. “We have no problem with letting these ladies rip each other’s heads off. That’s what we’re here for. But we intend to take very seriously those who do not adhere to the subject matter of a particular thread. “

While taking great effort to keep its users on-point is certainly a category-differentiator on the part of JDMC.com, it’s not the only one.

“We’ve also redefined the role of our moderators,” said JDMC.com head of IT, James Clark. “Whereas the role of most moderators is to keep the vitriol to a minimum, our moderators will actually insert instigatory posts into threads in an effort to rile these ladies up. Last week I watched a thread’s participants drone on about baby formula VS breastmilk, which usually makes for a very heated, exciting exchange. After about fifteen civil, dull posts, I felt the need to throw in a ‘you gonna take that crap from this idiot woman who doesn’t know the difference between you’re and your?!’, and with that, we were off to the races.”

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